2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale
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A guide to bold, authentic Thai cooking from Andy Ricker, the chef and owner of the wildly popular and widely lauded Pok Pok restaurants.

After decades spent traveling throughout Thailand, Andy Ricker wanted to bring the country''s famed street food stateside. In 2005 he opened Pok Pok, so named for the sound a pestle makes when it strikes a clay mortar, in an old shack in a residential neighborhood of Portland, Oregon. Ricker''s traditional take on Thai food soon drew the notice of the New York Times and Gourmet magazine, establishing him as a culinary star. Now, with his first cookbook, Ricker tackles head-on the myths that keep people from making Thai food at home: that it''s too spicy for the American palate or too difficult to source ingredients.

Ricker shares more than fifty of the most popular recipes from Thailand and his Pok Pok restaurants—ranging from Khao Soi Kai (Northern Thai curry noodle soup with chicken) to Som Tam Thai (Central Thai–style papaya salad) to Pok Pok’s now-classic (and obsessed-over) Fish-Sauce Wings. But Pok Pok is more than just a collection of favorite recipes: it is also a master course in Thai cooking from one of the most passionate and knowledgeable authorities on the subject. Clearly written, impeccably tested recipes teach you how to source ingredients; master fundamental Thai cooking techniques and skills; understand flavor profiles that are unique to Southeast Asian cuisine; and combine various dishes to create show-stopping, well-balanced meals for family and friends.

Filled with thoughtful, colorful essays about Ricker’s travels and experiences, Pok Pok is not only a definitive resource for home cooks, but also a celebration of the rich history, vibrant culture, and unparalleled deliciousness of Thai food.

Amazon.com Review

Featured Recipes from Pok Pok

 

From Publishers Weekly

In his introduction, Ricker makes the modest proclamation that his cooking knowledge is limited when measured against Thailand’s vast cuisine. However, this limitation has had no visible effect on his success, given that his eatery, Pok Pok, was recently rated by Bon Appétit as the eighth most important American restaurant. All one really needs to know about Ricker, and this finely detailed cookbook and travelogue, comes at the start of his recipe for fish-sauce wings. Sounding like a gourmand Allen Ginsberg, he writes, “I’ve spent the better part of the last twenty years roaming around Thailand, cooking and recooking strange soups, beseeching street vendors for stir-fry tips, and trying to figure out how to reproduce obscure Thai products with American ingredients.” He spills out his acquired knowledge here across 13 chapters and nearly 100 recipes. Lessons learned along the way include the beauty of blandness as exhibited in his flavor-balanced “bland soup” with glass noodles, and waste not, want not, as showcased in recipes for stewed pork knuckles and grilled pork neck. Ricker’s prose, as aided by food writer Goode, is captivating, whether he is discussing America’s obsession with sateh, or when profiling characters he’s encountered in his travels, such as Mr. Lit, his “chicken mentor” and Sunny, his “go-to guy in Chiang Mai.”

Review

“In this groundbreaking masterwork, Andy Ricker weaves together superb recipes, enlightening cultural narratives, meaningful personal essays, and an incomparable insight into the essence of Thai foodways. But perhaps this book’s greatest achievement is the honest, uncompromising way it brings real Thai cookery right into American readers’ homes. The bar has been set for ethnic cookbooks going forward.”
—Andrew Zimmern

“Everything I know about Thai food I learned from Andy Ricker—how to order it, how to eat it, and now, how to cook it.  Pok Pok is destined to be the Thai bible for every adventurous home cook. Part memoir, part cooking manifesto, it beautifully and passionately shows Ricker’s no-nonsense approach to one of the world’s most exciting cuisines. When my daughters ask why they grew up eating so much khao soi kai, papaya salad, and laap pet isaan at home, I’ll tell them they have Andy Ricker—and this book—to thank.
—Andrew Knowlton, restaurant and drink editor, Bon Appétit
 
“More than a Thai cookbook or even a regional Thai cookbook, this is a book about people: the street and market vendors, home cooks, and restaurant owners who Andy Ricker has met and studied with for over two decades in Thailand. In Pok  Pok, Andy shares their stories, skills, and ideas—and his own passion for discovering a cuisine by going door to door. Oh yeah, and he makes some insanely delicious food along the way.”
—Francis Lam, writer and judge on Top Chef Masters
 
“You’d be hard-pressed to find better Thai food than what Andy Ricker is serving at Pok Pok. And now, with his cookbook, we finally get to see the people, places, and experiences that were the inspiration for it all.”
—David Chang, chef/owner of Momofuku 

“This book, as far as I’m concerned, is an argument ender. When Andy says ‘make som tam lao like this,’ it’s like Jacques Pépin telling you how to make an omelette.  The matter is settled. Previously, I would never have even attempted to prepare most of these dishes in my home. I had always felt that Thai food was best left to the experts. But this book has given me hope and confidence.”
—Anthony Bourdain

"In his introduction, Ricker makes the modest proclamation that his cooking knowledge is limited when measured against Thailand’s vast cuisine. However, this limitation has had no visible effect on his success, given that his eatery, Pok Pok, was recently rated by Bon Appétit as the eighth most important American restaurant. All one really needs to know about Ricker, and this finely detailed cookbook and travelogue, comes at the start of his recipe for fish-sauce wings. Sounding like a gourmand Allen Ginsberg, he writes, “I’ve spent the better part of the last twenty years roaming around Thailand, cooking and recooking strange soups, beseeching street vendors for stir-fry tips, and trying to figure out how to reproduce obscure Thai products with American ingredients.” He spills out his acquired knowledge here across 13 chapters and nearly 100 recipes. Lessons learned along the way include the beauty of blandness as exhibited in his flavor-balanced “bland soup” with glass noodles, and waste not, want not, as showcased in recipes for stewed pork knuckles and grilled pork neck. Ricker’s prose, as aided by food writer Goode, is captivating, whether he is discussing America’s obsession with sateh, or when profiling characters he’s encountered in his travels, such as Mr. Lit, his “chicken mentor” and Sunny, his “go-to guy in Chiang Mai.”
Publisher''s Weekly Starred Review

About the Author

ANDY RICKER  is a two time James Beard Award winning chef and owner of Pok Pok Restaurant in Portland, Oregon and several other establishments in Portland and New York, such as Whiskey Soda Lounge, Pok Pok Wing, Pok Pok Noi, Michelin Starred Pok Pok Ny, charcoal company Thaan and a drinking vinegar company called Pok Pok Som. He first visited Thailand as a backpacker in 1987. Since 1993, he has spent several months each year traveling, eating, cooking, and studying the food culture in Thailand. Andy currently splits his time between Portland, New York and Chiang Mai.
 
JJ GOODE is a Brooklyn-based food writer, and the coauthor of the books A Girl and Her Pig with April Bloomfield, Morimoto with Masaharu Morimoto, and Truly Mexican with Roberto Santibañez.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Foreword
by David Thompson
 
“One more plate of laap—please, Andy,” was my plea. I needed more. I had just finished a plate of this Northern Thai dish of chopped meat (pork, in this instance) mixed with spices and herbs. I have eaten laap many times before—it is a regional classic. However, this rendition was irresistible. The minced pork was rich and smoky, the spices bitter and tangy, the herbs enticingly aromatic. The combination of all these flavors left a wonderful taste that lingered long after I’d finished my last bite. I simply just had to order a second plate.

I confess I was surprised by how good it was; really, it had no right to be so delicious. After all, I was sitting in Portland, Oregon—a far, far cry from Chiang Mai, the Northern Thai city that is this dish’s home.

I guess I shouldn’t have been astonished. Andy may have opened his first Pok Pok restaurant in Portland, but the food he cooks has deep roots in Thailand. It might seem strange that this six-foot-tall Vermonter is cooking Northern Thai food so well, until you understand Andy’s love for the Thais, their cuisine, and in particular the hazy mountainous province of Chiang Mai. Andy makes regular visits to Thailand, where he trawls the markets—watching, asking questions, and collecting recipes. He chats engagingly with local cooks, who share with him tips and techniques—but he is also a keen observer, and gets ideas and knowledge from furtively watching other, unsuspecting cooks. Either way, by whatever means, Andy gets the goods.
Whenever Andy comes to Thailand, I see him in Bangkok, where I live, and occasionally we travel together up-country. Accompanying Andy as he pursues his culinary quarry can be exhausting. He moves quickly from shop to shop, market to market, or village to village with nary a regard for his fellow travelers. He walks past the stalls that don’t pass muster, refusing to stop, while those of us in his wake bleat plaintively, wanting to eat, looking longingly at dishes he dismisses and leaves untouched. Mr. Ricker demands the best and thus he commands my respect, even if I do often end up hungry, tired, and sulky.

Andy has turned his not being Thai into an advantage. He is not limited by an inherent belief, as many Thais are, that his mother’s is the best and the only way to cook. His approach is much broader and more encompassing; he casts his culinary net wider, across all of Northern Thailand and its verdant and fertile fields.

Andy first backpacked through Asia and landed in Thailand in 1987, around the time I was making those same laps. I am surprised I didn’t run into him. Although, given the similarity of our quests, our mutual love for Thailand, and our crazy partying ways, it’s quite possible we did. . . .
Andy’s moment of culinary epiphany came over a mushroom. Mine was over a serpent head fish, clearly demonstrating that we can’t choose our moments. The objects of our inspiration—some fungi and a fish, respectively—might seem silly, but in the end, they prompted both of us to change the course of our lives, including how we eat and cook.
I still recall that sour orange curry of serpent head fish, tart with tamarind leaves, plump with flavor. The seasoning, tastes, and textures of that curry transformed my understanding of Thai food. From then on I was hooked.

I moved to Bangkok to learn about the city’s remarkable cuisine, regal past, and sophisticated tastes, opening a few swank restaurants in the process. Meanwhile, Andy was researching up-country, eating his way through the north of Thailand. Later he opened the first Pok Pok restaurant in Portland on a maxed-out credit card, a mortgage, and with little capital. In the decade since then, he has established himself as an important voice in Thai cooking and an emissary of Northern Thai food internationally.

I remember working with Andy in both New York City and Portland and being amazed at his rather informal approach to cooking, kitchens, and restaurants. His very first restaurant was built out of his kitchen and partially demolished house, the food served through a window onto his porch and into the backyard—much like some small countryside restaurant in Thailand. You see, I come from the dainty world of fine dining, where certain things—such as grilling over charcoal in smoky forty-four-gallon drums, backyard coconut pressing, drinking beer on the job out of glass jars, fermenting mustard greens on the roof, and more beer drinking—were simply not done (unfortunately). But the casual appearance of Andy’s restaurants belies the rigorous, ambitious cooking that happens in his kitchens. He is obsessed with making the very best food he can. I admire the canny way he doctors his lime juice to approximate the taste of lime juice in Thailand, the resourceful way he finds and secures Thai produce, and his faithful adherence to Thai recipes, techniques, and tastes. The restaurants may not look terribly fancy, but inside, Andy and his Pok Pok crew are complete perfectionists, constantly adjusting and tinkering with their recipes to ensure everything is right.

Andy has almost singlehandedly created a market for regional Thai cuisine in the United States. Such food was practically unknown in the US before Pok Pok, but now, many of the dishes he cooks are the objects of cultlike devotion. For proof of his swashbuckling success, simply observe the lines that wind down the street outside of the Pok Pok restaurants. People clamor for his food—a style of cooking that they didn’t know existed before 2005. One excellent example is that delectable pork laap, which was as lip-smackingly good as any version I have found in Thailand.

While eagerly waiting for my second plate, I looked across our table—with its now-empty plates of grilled sausages, noodle salads, soups, curries, and chili dips—to the other tables of equally replete and happy diners. I couldn’t help but wonder, what would this damned skillful cook do next?

Well, you’re now holding Andy’s latest project: the Pok Pok cookbook. In it, Andy chronicles Chiang Mai’s wide-ranging culinary repertoire—including my longed-for pork laap, a sour orange curry quite similar to the one that first enthralled me so many years ago, and many other Northern dishes. This book is the product of years and years of research, practice, and experience, and clearly demonstrates why Andy and Pok Pok are so successful: great food; honest, practical advice and guidance; and a sincere desire to please without compromising the integrity of the cuisine. It’s a winning recipe.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
705 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Esther Schindler
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
More "recipe porn" than Tuesday night supper, but that doesn''t keep it from being a great cookbook
Reviewed in the United States on May 8, 2016
My husband used to travel regularly to Portland Oregon, where he became a devotee of the Pok Pok restaurant. So when the cookbook was first announced, I immediately pre-ordered a copy... way back in 2013. However, I didn''t actually cook a recipe from it until this... See more
My husband used to travel regularly to Portland Oregon, where he became a devotee of the Pok Pok restaurant. So when the cookbook was first announced, I immediately pre-ordered a copy... way back in 2013. However, I didn''t actually cook a recipe from it until this week.

Huh? How could I possibly do that, and still give the cookbook 5 stars? Easy: Think of it as food journalism and picture-book food porn, and it''s still awesome. I compare it to cookbooks like those from Heston Blumenthal; it doesn''t bother me that this is a "reading" cookbook rather than one that''s going to earn food stains.

Pok Pok is about doing Thai cooking *authentically*. While the U.S. has embraced Thai cuisine enthusiastically, I learned, we don''t have access to all the same ingredients as people do in Thailand. Nor do we have (or take) the time to prepare everything from scratch, especially when that means creating two or three ingredients that are each time-consuming processes. (I learned this first-hand in the 80s, when the closest Thai restaurant was 250 miles away. If I wanted to use a half cup of coconut milk in the peanut sauce for chicken sate, I had to start out by making the coconut milk... beginning with a whole coconut.)

But if you want to do it _right_, you have access to the right markets, and you desire to learn about Thai culture as well as gain a collection of Thai recipes, this book is truly great.

The author goes into lots of detail about Thai dishes that we sort of take for granted, here. In the U.S., larb (or laap) is a main-dish salad of minced pork (sometimes chicken) seasoned with fish sauce, chili flakes, lime juice, and fresh herbs (usually mint). Here, we get nine pages of explanation, photos, and recipe how-to. And the ingredients are apt to be a challenge for most of us; beyond the mundane pork loin, cumin seeds, cilantro and so on it calls for sawtooth herb, puya chiles, Sichuan peppercorns, pork small intestine, pork skin, pork liver, fresh or frozen galangal, lemongrass, and raw pork blood. I think I can get most or all of those (there''s a good meat shop here in town that butchers its own hogs), but it''d take a concerted effort to gather all of them -- even before we get to the preparation. Somehow I''ve never bothered.

Not EVERYthing is a big hairy deal. For example, the recipe I (finally) made is Isaan Steak Salad. You marinate flank steak in a mixture of thin soy sauce, black pepper, and lemongrass, grill it, and serve it with salad of shallots, mint, cilantro, and toasted-sticky rice powder (I omitted that), and a dressing of lime juice, fish sauce, beef stock, sugar, lemongrass, and a tablespoon of toasted-chili powder. I left out the chili powder too, because making it (1/3 cup of it) means stir-frying an ounce of dried Mexican puya chiles for 20 minutes. My husband remembers that powder as wonderful and unique -- but it just wasn''t going to happen. Still, given my access to an Asian market, I could lay my hands on all the other ingredients, and it made a mighty fine weeknight dinner.

End result: When I look through this cookbook, I''m apt to drool... and to say, "Honey, when are we getting back to Portland?"
35 people found this helpful
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Anne DeTraglia
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
FEAR NOT, IT''S EASIER THAN FIRST IMPRESSIONS WOULD HAVE YOU BELIEVE.
Reviewed in the United States on July 16, 2019
My first impression upon reading this cookbook was probably not unusual. "My god! I''m so confused! I could never make these recipes!" That first impression was bloody friggin'' wrong. Once you have stocked your Thai pantry (which takes a bit of... See more
My first impression upon reading this cookbook was probably not unusual. "My god! I''m so confused! I could never make these recipes!"

That first impression was bloody friggin'' wrong.

Once you have stocked your Thai pantry (which takes a bit of diligence but is, in fact, not so difficult if you bring this book to a decent Asian market) and cooked a few recipes a couple of times, you will discover that the recipes are really not so difficult. And here''s the kicker...the recipes are both really good and totally doable on a weeknight. Seriously, I just threw one together in 30 minutes.

I''ve probably cooked a dozen recipes (several of which I''ve made several times), and the flavors are bold, eye-opening, and utterly fantastic. This is one of my favorite cookbooks ever. Even my teenagers love dinners from the Pok Pok cookbook.

Buy it, cook from it, love it.
11 people found this helpful
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kgrimey
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Best Thai Cookbook
Reviewed in the United States on May 7, 2015
This is the best cookbook I own. It doesn''t get any better. The recipes are so precise that it''s impossible to screw them up, and everything I''ve made so far has been authentic tasting and DELICIOUS. I bought this immediately after returning from a vacation in Thailand... See more
This is the best cookbook I own. It doesn''t get any better. The recipes are so precise that it''s impossible to screw them up, and everything I''ve made so far has been authentic tasting and DELICIOUS. I bought this immediately after returning from a vacation in Thailand because I wanted to make northern Thai dishes like khao soi that weren''t featured in the Thai cookbook that I already owned. I took a couple of cooking classes while in Thailand, so I was already familiar with some of the ingredients and preparation techniques, so I don''t find anything difficult about the recipes, but then again, most of them are pretty simple anyway. The only difficult part is finding the right ingredients, but if you don''t have asian markets in your area, the book includes a list of websites where you can buy them. Another important aspect of this book is that it lists recipe ingredients by weight, and not by quantity or volume. A lot of ingredients in Thailand are very different than they are here. For example, garlic cloves and shallots in Thailand are about half the size that they are here, so its crucial that they are listed by weight in the recipes.

The only complaint I have is that the kindle version is a little clunky and the formatting didn''t translate well. I''d recommend getting the hard cover. Other than that I love it.

One last thing...make sure to buy a stone mortar and pestle with this book. You''ll need it. The Libertyware GMP6 Granite 6" Mortar & Pestle Set that I got on amazon works great and is plenty big for all of the curry pastes in the cookbook. Enjoy!!!
42 people found this helpful
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Aj96
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Incredibly descriptive, spot on, delicious cookbook
Reviewed in the United States on February 13, 2020
This is an incredible cookbook. The first cookbook that made me feel accomplished as a cook in my house, I’ve been making recipes from the book weekly. The recipes often have a lot of ingredients but they’re easy enough to find and the directions are spot on. I also love... See more
This is an incredible cookbook. The first cookbook that made me feel accomplished as a cook in my house, I’ve been making recipes from the book weekly. The recipes often have a lot of ingredients but they’re easy enough to find and the directions are spot on. I also love that the book includes a flavor palate for each recipe, letting you know if it will be sweet, sour, earthy, spicy, herbal, etc. I’ve found this flavor palate to be spot on for each recipe I’ve made. My favorites are the stews, curries, and soups, which I will be regularly making for the foreseeable future. Every recipe has a picture of the final product, and every picture looks yummy enough to inspire you to find all the ingredients and make it.
4 people found this helpful
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Fastidious Kingdoms
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Well done.
Reviewed in the United States on March 18, 2019
I appreciate this look at Thai cuisine, and I respect the author for not romanticizing it or bemoaning “the loss of the traditional ways.” He recognizes that the Thai don’t live in a hermetically sealed bottle any more than Americans do: “Many members of the younger... See more
I appreciate this look at Thai cuisine, and I respect the author for not romanticizing it or bemoaning “the loss of the traditional ways.” He recognizes that the Thai don’t live in a hermetically sealed bottle any more than Americans do: “Many members of the younger generation of Thais no longer want to take over their parents’ food stalls or learn the secrets of their grandmothers’ bamboo shoot salads. They want to go to college, move to Bangkok, or leave the country. And like kids just about everywhere nowadays, they’re eager to eat at KFC. These changes aren’t bad or good. They reflect a changing economy that has created new opportunities for young Thais. It is what it is.”

I also respect the author for flat-out stating that he’s stolen most of these recipes, and I appreciate the work he’s gone to to find substitutions available in America.

I now know more than I did about Thai foodways. I only regret that I won’t be able to make any of it (my husband is allergic to tamarind, and I’m quite intimidated by the mortar and pestle). I wish other cooks bon appetit!
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MARIAH DENN
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Book version is awesome. Kindle version stinks.
Reviewed in the United States on February 5, 2019
UPDATE : 10-31-2020. Bummed that Pok Pok is closing. FInally bought all 3 books. OUTSTANDING! Recipes are kinda complicated and ingredients are hard to find. BUT.... it inspires you to step outside your comfort zone. Totally worth it. $25 for the... See more
UPDATE : 10-31-2020. Bummed that Pok Pok is closing.
FInally bought all 3 books.
OUTSTANDING! Recipes are kinda complicated and ingredients are hard to find.
BUT.... it inspires you to step outside your comfort zone.
Totally worth it. $25 for the original book.
This backs up my original review - the kindle version sucks.
The HARDBACK book is awesome - the physical book AND the content.
Andy Ricker, you made a huge difference. Thank you.
--------------------------------------
OLD REVIEW - KINDLE VERSION
I do not have much space for storage, so I bought the Kindle version.
The Kindle version is crap.
I will be buying the hard copy version.
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Kindle Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book but....
Reviewed in the United States on November 16, 2017
This really is an interesting book. Stories intermixed with recipes that can be quite different from what you may have seen before. I was intrigued by the northern version of laap and so set out in search of some hard to find ingredients. I''m still laughing at the response... See more
This really is an interesting book. Stories intermixed with recipes that can be quite different from what you may have seen before. I was intrigued by the northern version of laap and so set out in search of some hard to find ingredients. I''m still laughing at the response of the young man in one store - "yeeeessss. We have pigs blood" "FOR YOU????" . At any rate, after 2days prepping this involved recipe, it was ready. Really really different though.
My one complaint is how the recipe ingredients are broken out on the pages. I would prefer to have the recipe list a cumulative total of ingredients to make shopping\assembly easier. Perhaps in book format it is easier to follow , but the kindle version had me going back and forth on pages to figure out how much cilantro etc was needed because each step listed it''s own amounts. That said, buy this book anyway!
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Raybador
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Terrific cook book for real Thai flavors
Reviewed in the United States on April 13, 2014
Bought this to share with my spouse - we both enjoy Thai cooking. There is something of an initial investment of time and effort involved getting started, and it involves buying the ingredients that are important for the unique flavors, like galangal. We have had no trouble... See more
Bought this to share with my spouse - we both enjoy Thai cooking. There is something of an initial investment of time and effort involved getting started, and it involves buying the ingredients that are important for the unique flavors, like galangal. We have had no trouble at all finding those items in the nearby international food stores.

The recipes appear long and complicated, but the one''s we have tried come together easily. Ricker simply is detailed and tells you everything you need to know. The ingredient portions are based on precise weights rather than volume measures - and that''s a real advantage in our kitchen.

There are several hundred cookbooks in our kitchen; this is one of the few that comes off the shelf often.
6 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Really very good
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 4, 2014
Hurrah !.... A thai cookbook that''s not dumbed down..... no hold back on proper in your face flavour profiles. Exciting, challenging, a bugger to get hold of some of the ingredients I warn you now but worth the effort Not just the usual curries but also rellishes , salads...See more
Hurrah !.... A thai cookbook that''s not dumbed down..... no hold back on proper in your face flavour profiles. Exciting, challenging, a bugger to get hold of some of the ingredients I warn you now but worth the effort Not just the usual curries but also rellishes , salads (Thai style) , grilled dishes, all sorts. I made the Kaeng Hung Leh tonight..... bloody lovely ! Some of it is pushing boundries ..... som tam with fermented fish and salted mud crab for example.....but that''s all good in my book. If David Thompsons "Thai" is the venerable and knowledgeable grand parent then Pok Pok is the upstart but talented facebook generation grandchild. Recommended. --------------------- Update : Made the Som Tam the Pok Pok way (with tamerind water and palm sugar) which is differnt to my usual way....and it''s great.....so another hit.
15 people found this helpful
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D. Taylor
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Thai Street Food Cookbook
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 18, 2014
Having travelled a few times to Thailand I live the street food and restaurants. I have been looking for a book like this for some time to replicate the food I love. This has many if those recipes. Whilst some if the ingredients are hard to find you will get most in Chinese...See more
Having travelled a few times to Thailand I live the street food and restaurants. I have been looking for a book like this for some time to replicate the food I love. This has many if those recipes. Whilst some if the ingredients are hard to find you will get most in Chinese supermarkets or online. Great book, tells you how to do many of the greats and pastes, etc. A definite purchase.
3 people found this helpful
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Holly Alley
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good value for the price
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 3, 2018
Excellent gave it as a present he was thrilled with it
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London Ipsum
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 23, 2015
Fantastic book - especially love the burmese pork / chiang mai pork curry dish.
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Gary Romanuk
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 12, 2017
Great book.
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2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale

2021 popular Pok Pok: Food and Stories outlet online sale from the lowest Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand [A Cookbook] sale